New Senate Ag Committee members announced

Committee membership will be evenly split with 11 Democrats and 11 Republicans.
EDITED BY ANNE BLANKENBILLER
U.S. Capitol

Senate leadership has announced new members of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry for the 117th Congress, chaired by U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.). The new members were named after the confirmation hearing for Tom Vilsack to become the Secretary of Agriculture.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced new Democratic members of the Senate Agriculture Committee. Those include Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ben Ray Lujan of New Mexico and Raphael Warnock of Georgia. Sen. Bob Casey, R-Pa., has left the committee.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., also announced that newly elected GOP Sens. Roger Marshall of Kansas and Tommy Tuberville of Alabama would join the returning members of the Senate Agriculture Committee.

Returning members of the committee include majority members Patrick Leahy (Vermont), Sherrod Brown (Ohio), Amy Klobuchar (Minnesota), Michael Bennet (Colorado), Kristen Gillibrand (New York), Tina Smith (Minnesota), Richard Durbin (Illinois). Minority members returning to the committee include John Boozman (Arkansas), Mitch McConnell (Kentucky), John Hoeven (North Dakota), Joni Ernst (Iowa), Cindy Hyde-Smith (Mississippi), Charles Grassley (Iowa), John Thune (South Dakota), Deb Fischer (Nebraska) and Mike Braun (Indiana).

The committee will be evenly split with 11 Democrats and 11 Republicans.

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