NGWA wraps Groundwater Week

The first virtual Groundwater Week was held Dec. 8-11.
EDITED BY ANNE BLANKENBILLER
NGWA Groundwater Week 2020

The National Ground Water Association concluded Groundwater Week 2020 on Friday, Dec. 11. Groundwater Week 2020 was NGWA’s first all-virtual annual trade show. Groundwater Week is the trade show and conference designed to provide educational and networking experiences to groundwater professionals.

While traditionally held in-person, restrictions on gatherings due to the COVID-19 pandemic led to the decision to move to a virtual format.

“While the format was different this year, the event still provided many of the great experiences our industry expects from Groundwater Week,” said NGWA CEO Terry S. Morse, CAE, CIC. “I’m extremely proud of what we were able to accomplish and look forward to getting started on planning our in-person event next year in Nashville.”

Groundwater Week 2020 was attended by over 2,500 groundwater professionals from 59 countries across and offered four days of educational sessions, product demos and opportunities to visit the virtual exhibit hall.  The show also featured keynote speaker Kevin McGinnis’ speech, “Establishing Social Distancing Between Contamination and Drinking Water Systems,” and the 2020 NGWA Industry Awards Ceremony.

Groundwater Week 2021 will return to an in-person event from Dec 14-16 in Nashville, Tennessee.

 

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