USCIS updates immigration and naturalization fees, publishes final rule

The rule is effective April 1, 2024, and the adjustments aim to help USCIS cover operational costs and improve application processing times.
EDITED BY LUKE REYNOLDS
Immigration document

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Washington, D.C., published a final rule adjusting immigration and naturalization benefit request fees, the first update since 2016.  

The rule is effective April 1, 2024, and the adjustments aim to help USCIS cover operational costs and improve application processing times. 

“For the first time in over seven years, USCIS is updating our fees to better meet the needs of our agency, enabling us to provide more timely decisions to those we serve,” says USCIS Director Ur Jaddou. “Despite years of inadequate funding, the USCIS workforce has made great strides in customer service, backlog reduction, implementing new processes and programs, and upholding fairness, integrity and respect for all we serve.” 

The final rule follows a fee review and a period of public comment, leading to several changes, including reduced cost recovery needs by $727 million through efficiency improvements, expanded fee exemptions and discounts for various groups such as a $50 discount for online filings.  

The new rule caps fee increases at a maximum of 26%, aligning with the rise in the Consumer Price Index since the last update. 

The revenue from the updated fees will support USCIS in addressing case backlogs and enhancing customer service.  

USCIS also announced a grace period from April 1, 2024, to June 3, 2024, where both old and new form versions will be accepted with the correct fees.  

However, certain forms will require immediate use of the new fee calculation. 

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