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In a flash

Sudden drought carries a heavy potential impact on crops in the Southeast.

Flash drought is generally understood to be the rapid onset or intensification of relatively short-term agricultural drought. It occurs because of lower-than-normal rates of precipitation accompanied by abnormally high temperatures, winds and solar radiation. Together, these changes increase evapotranspiration and rapidly lower soil moisture. In sandy soils with low water-holding capacity, flash drought may quickly result in crop water stress and, depending on crop growth stage, significant yield losses to rainfed crops. The U.S. Drought Monitor (droughtmonitor.unl.edu), which is often used to justify federal assistance for crop damage resulting from drought, may not always identify localized flash droughts.

IN THIS ISSUE

    • Editorial message

      Welcome to the new year! I hope everyone had a chance to rest and relax over the holidays with family and friends.
    • Economy

      There is a social and community aspect of irrigated agriculture that is not often addressed in this periodical.
    • Legislative update

      Uncertainty in key global markets for U.S. ag exports like Mexico and China, and drought in many parts of the country all represent challenges for farmers and related industries.
    • Your best practice

      While sprinklers are known to last many years, regular maintenance can ensure they stay working at their fullest potential.
    • Tech corner

      While growers constantly monitor their water use, they generally stop tracking it once it hits the soil.
    • Industry insights

      The 2022 Irrigation Show and Education Week took place Dec. 5-9, in Las Vegas, Nevada, drawing a crowd of nearly 4,000 attendees from coast to coast.
    • Association news

      Get the latest IA and ag association updates.
      • Weather outlook

        Despite recent California headlines of flash flooding, debris flows and small dam failures, cool-season storminess has been instrumental in reducing Western drought coverage and intensity.

FEATURES

Soil moisture sensors are a valuable tool that can be utilized to schedule irrigation.

For growers, integrating new systems, technologies, tools and strategies into an existing irrigation management plan presents several risks and challenges.

One of the top priorities of an irrigation manager is to ensure that their irrigation system applies a uniform depth of water across the irrigated area.

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